6 Common Late Fall Riding Hazards

Many riders would agree, fall is prime motorcycle season. Near perfect temperatures, clear blue skies, changing leaves and less traffic on favorite backroads make for great end-of-season rides.

On the other hand, fall has a few downsides. With winter right around the corner, riders have to be mindful of freezing overnight temperatures and black ice. These hazards, combined with falling leaves, roadwork and drivers who aren’t expecting to see motorcycles this time of year, remind us to ride carefully and defensively through the end of fall.

As you enjoy the few mild autumn days we have left here in New England, keep these points in mind.

1. Beware of Fallen Leaves

fallen leaves on the road Our region of the country is a must-see spot for leaf peepers – however, changing leaves have to come down eventually. When they do, they can form a slick, muddy blanket that greatly reduces tire traction. An unsuspecting motorcyclist may start to slip and slide, especially if their tire treads are worn out.

Large leaf piles can obscure potholes and uneven pavement, also catching riders by surprise. Added to this, high winds may bring small branches down with the leaves, creating another level of obstruction.

With these risks in mind, here’s how to approach a leaf-covered road this season:

  • Ride around the piles, as you never know what lies underneath.
  • Go slow, until you’re past the areas with fallen leaves and acorns.
  • Make sure your tires have sufficient traction.
  • Slow down and take care around corners.
  • Never ride over broken branches, as they have potential to rip and puncture your tires.

2. Adjust to Shorter Days

When daylight saving time comes to an end, you’re more likely to end a late afternoon ride in the dark. For this reason, make sure your bike’s headlights, brake lights and turn signals are all in working order. So other motorists can see you, further make yourself visible with reflective clothing.

This time of year, the sun now sits lower in the sky. Unless you’re traveling north, this positioning often creates glare and, with fewer leaves on the trees, there is nothing to block the light. To reduce the blinding glow and any potential accidents, make sure you’re equipped with appropriate eyewear and take it slow when the sun prevents you from seeing far ahead.

3. Think About Animals

Plenty of creatures are migrating south, searching for food or seeking hibernation this time of year. Due to these factors, you’re more likely to come across deer and other medium-to-large mammals, especially at dawn and dusk. To anticipate this risk, ride with appropriate protective gear and keep your eyes peeled for animals approaching from the side of the road.
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4 Tips for Riding Over Rough Pavement

You’re enjoying a smooth ride when suddenly, your motorcycle hits a bump. You maneuver your way around the potholes and loose gravel in the road, hoping for smooth asphalt around the bend.

For cars, these disturbances are a minor annoyance but for motorcycles, they can lead to a fall or bike damage. Unfortunately, you’re likely to encounter uneven, ridged roads at some point while out on your motorcycle. What can you do to get through these rough patches?

1. Plan Ahead for Rough Pavement

road construction signWhen you see signs for construction or enter a highly trafficked road, you may ride over:

  • A grooved surface
  • Gravel or an unpaved surface
  • Rumble strips, usually around diverted routes and construction zones
  • Fresh pavement, which brings oil to the surface when wet
  • Slick pavement, worn-out blackout tape and pavement markings
  • Steel plates, which may be smooth or rough in texture
  • Manhole covers

In particular, pavement milling can be very noticeable on bikes with narrow front tires. When driving over these uneven surfaces, don’t panic. Stay relaxed and ride through it slowly.

In many of these instances, the change is sudden. Coupled with the uneven or traction-free surface, your bike may become harder to control. Take it slow and allow yourself enough time to see the obstructions before passing over them.

2. Look for Smoother Ground

Maneuver around ridged, cracked areas and seek out smoother ground. Similarly for slick surfaces, move around what appears to be wet, oily or shiny. Keep in mind that on highways, this smooth area may toward the center of the lane. Be careful of debris that ordinary motor vehicles can drive over.
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Brushing Up on Your Riding Skills

Warm days and clear roads are finally here! Before you hop on your motorcycle this spring, think about how you will refresh your skills to stay safe.

Refresh Yourself

Like many skills, riding a motorcycle is all about muscle memory. When winter arrives and you take a hiatus for several months, you may need to refresh your skills with a quick ride around the neighborhood.

If you feel like you need a more thorough refresher, motorcycle safety classes cover basic skills, maneuvers and strategies.

Stay in Shape

two men riding their motorcycles in the sunshineIt’s a good idea to keep your muscles in shape. Particularly during the holiday season, you may relax and put on a few pounds. Once spring arrives, your body suddenly has to get back into the groove of riding.
Maintaining your physical fitness has many benefits, including:

  • Improved stamina, so you’ll be able to ride farther.
  • Better physical flexibility.
  • Greater concentration, so you can stay focused on longer routes and road trips.

Work on Bike Maintenance

It’s never a good idea to throw your bike into storage and leave it unchecked until spring. Pests, rust and corrosion, mold and viscous fluids may negatively affect its condition. Even after sufficient pre-storage prep, check your bike and make repairs before the new season.
The end of winter into early spring is the prime time to start making these updates. To begin, put together a checklist that covers the following:

  • Suspension adjustments
  • Engine tune-up
  • Valve adjustments
  • Fluid changes
  • Battery check

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How to Plan Your First Spring Motorcycle Trip

Once the warm weather of spring arrives, you’ll be back on your motorcycle. Are you ready for your first trip? Rather than hitting the pavement with no destination in mind, plan ahead to increase your chances of a successful journey.

1. Know Where You’re Going

riding motorcycle on a sunny dayFor your first trip, choose a familiar destination where you already know the roads. However, potholes and uneven pavement may not be addressed by early spring. Even a route you know well could present a few riding challenges.

Wherever you go, you will need the stamina to get there. No one wants to get fatigued halfway through and turn around. Pick somewhere you know you can ride to without significant warm up. If you’re traveling in a group, decide on the destination together.

You can also get a sense of the route and current conditions with a trip in the car.

2. Pack Up Supplies

Never set out on a motorcycle trip without the right supplies. Bring the appropriate riding gear, including waterproof pieces in case of rain. This time of year, temperatures can still plunge unexpectedly, so have a balaclava, gloves and a lightweight set of layers.

On the flip side, you don’t want to lug around too much gear. Clothing aside, stick to the basics for warmth, shelter and food without weighing down your bike.

3. Check Your Motorcycle

Even if your motorcycle was properly winterized, it will likely need maintenance before your first ride:

  • Fuel: You likely added fuel stabilizer before placing your bike into storage, but make sure your bike has fresh gasoline before you set out.
  • Tires: Check the tires for flat spots, lumps, general unevenness and proper inflation.
  • Fluids: Change the oil and check the brake fluid to make sure your bike is not leaking.
  • Belts: Check the belt drive system for wear and tear.
  • Suspension: Check for rust and tarnishing around the suspension system and have it scrubbed off.

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4 Tips for Spring Motorcycle Rides

When spring arrives, we want to get out, hit and road and feel the wind as we travel. While adventure is likely on your mind this time of year, it’s important to be practical. We need to check our bikes for things like pests and old fluids, as well as brush up on our riding skills.

After you perform a motorcycle tune-up, what’s next? As you get ready for the first few rides of the season, think about the following points.

1. Have the Right Gear

riding on a sunny dayYou can never be too careful, even when circling the block to get back in the swing of things. Prepare for uneven pavement, potholes, accidents and unpredictable weather with the right riding gear:

  • Have your motorcycle jacket, pants and boots ready to wear, rather than jeans and a T-shirt.
  • Spring brings rain showers, so have your waterproof gear on-hand in case you’re caught in a storm.
  • Don’t forget your cold weather gear for chilly spring evenings. Extra insulation is essential when you’re riding through cool temperatures and windy conditions.
  • Will you be riding at dusk or past sundown? Have a clear visor, balaclava and glove liners to combat the chill.

2. Take Things Slow

We’re all looking forward to lengthy trips through back roads and down the coast, but these rides shouldn’t be on your radar yet. Now is the time to remember how it feels to ride and get your skills back up to speed. What can you do?

  • Circle the block a few times and be sure to stay local.
  • Understand your reaction time could be a bit slower in the beginning.
  • Go around corners slowly, as you remember how to shift the weight of the bike into the curve.
  • Stick to familiar roads and routes but understand there could be winter damage, like potholes.
  • Travel the speed limit or slower, as other motorists may not be expecting to see motorcycles and could pull out in front of you.
  • Always follow the rules of the road and drive defensively.

3. Think About Mechanical Issues

After the tires have been inspected and the fluids changed, your bike could still experience mechanical issues. Aside from staying on familiar routes close to home, anticipate any potential breakdowns and have a cell phone on-hand. Plan who to call for help in the event of a breakdown.
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4 Summer Road Safety Tips for Motorcyclists

Our favorite time of year is here: Summer! As motorcyclists, we especially love the longer days, open roads and bountiful sunshine. While this season often has the perfect weather for riding, it’s important to keep safety in mind. The following tips can help everyone to be safer on the roads this summer.

1. Watch Out For Traffic

motorcycle driving through trafficSummertime brings a tremendous amount of traffic to roadways statewide. Be sure to watch out for all vehicles, including cars, trucks and bicycles, as well as pedestrians.

Never ride in another motorist’s blind spot, as a sudden lane switch or door opening could spill you off your bike. Ride safely and defensively to protect yourself and other drivers on the road.

2. Get Your Practice In

While charity motorcycle events can be the highlight of the summer, it’s important to be prepared for a large organized ride. If you have never participated in a group ride, be sure to get some riding time in beforehand.

During the journey to your shared destination, keep a two-second stagger between yourself and other riders and never lane switch. If one rider goes down, it could lead to a dangerous domino effect.

3. Be Prepared for Construction

All motorists should approach construction sites with caution, but motorcyclists have particular risks to keep in mind. When the road is being milled, slow down and ride at a comfortable pace, relaxing your grip on the controls. Do not make any sudden maneuvers for your own and the workers’ safety. If you have a narrow front tire, know this can magnify the effects of road milling.

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Tips for Riding a Motorcycle in Traffic

When you do not speed, drink and ride, or go to the left into oncoming traffic, your chances of being in a fatal motorcycle accident are greatly reduced. Following the rules of the road is also a good rule of thumb to stay safe, but this can be more difficult for motorcyclists – especially in traffic. There are many blind spots with vehicles and its far more dangerous for riders when a truck is involved. Not only can we be less visible to drivers, but stop and go traffic can make the bike harder to handle. 

We offer 4 tips to ride safely in traffic. 

Watch Other Drivers

motorcycle driving through trafficIf surrounding motorists fail to see you, it becomes your responsibility to keep an eye on them. Watching their mirrors and head movements can help you anticipate a sudden maneuver that could knock you down. Especially in congested traffic, a motorcycle can get lost in a car’s blind spot. Keep your head on a swivel to help prevent a tragic accident.

Pick a Side

When traffic slows during rush hour, never position your bike directly behind a vehicle. Many motorists are guilty of speeding up at the first sign of open road, only to slam on the brakes when cars get backed up again. If you stay to the left or right of the vehicle in front of you, there is room to get around if the driver stops short. Rather than slamming into their bumper and risking being thrown from the bike, choose a side to lean towards.

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4 Fall Foliage Season Rides in New England

Autumn is arguably the most beautiful season in New England. The trees flourish with bright colored leaves and we adorn our homes with festive fall decorations. As temperatures drop into the 60s, we are more excited than ever to get our bikes out on the road. The air feels crisper and summer road trip traffic has died down, making fall the perfect time to ride. We list 4 of the best places to enjoy fall foliage season on two wheels in New England.

Connecticut Route 169

colorful fall foliageBeginning in Norwich, scenic Route 169 takes riders on a tour of farms, historic churches and classic village green centers. Eastern Connecticut has a beautiful landscape of rolling hills and old backroads that provide fantastic views during fall foliage season.

For 32 miles, our fellow motorcyclists can ride through quaint towns like Lisbon, Centerbury and Woodstock along Route 169, ending in Southbridge, MA. Remember to put on your helmet before crossing into Massachusetts!

North Appalachian Mountains

The northwestern corner of Connecticut is much quieter than the hustle and bustle of Hartford and its surrounding towns. To get away from it all, visit the North Appalachian Mountains in New Milford. From Granby, ride from Route 20 to Route 44 towards Lakeville and Sharon. Cross the Cornwall Bridge and enjoy the vibrant colors of fall around you.

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Fall Motorcycle Riding Tips

While every rider enjoys the warm weather of summer, fall can be just as fun for motorcycle trips. The brilliant foliage, crisp air and reduced traffic makes autumn a great time for hitting the open road – if you are prepared.

For all the scenic enjoyment that fall brings to New England, there are also plenty of hazards. From poor weather and wild animal crossings to slick roads and sudden drops in temperature, riders need to stay alert to make motorcycle riding in autumn a safe and fun experience.

Here are some tips on how to safely navigate the pitfalls of the fall season.

Look at the Leaves

riding a motorcycle in the rainFall foliage attracts thousands of visitors to New England every year. The striking red, yellow and orange colors can turn forests into magical landscapes. However, when the leaves start to fall, riders need to take notice. Dry leaves often gather in piles, which can cover up a pothole or other hazardous road condition. When approaching a pile of dry leaves, slow down and try to steer around it. You never know what might be lurking underneath!

On the other hand, wet leaves are no better. Rain and morning dew cause wet leaves that can make for a very slick surface. Many riders will tell you stories of spills caused by wet leaves. Again, be cautious around wet leaves and slow down when rain has fallen.

Deer in the Headlights

We’ve all seen the damage a full-grown buck can do to a car, whether on the news or from real life experience. Just imagine what it would do to you and your motorcycle if you collide? Fall is a popular time for deer to come out of the woods and make their way across roads, so be on the lookout for these large animals. Wild turkeys and black bears will be moving as well. 

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Top Hazards for Motorcycles

Riding a motorcycle is one of those life thrills that is hard to match. Traveling down an empty backroad on two wheels with the wind flowing across your body and the power of the bike underneath is a unique experience only riders understand.

However, with this thrill comes many hazards that every motorcyclist needs to be aware of before hitting the road. The following dangers are widely regarded as the most important for riders to pay attention to. And remember, other motorists are not always looking out for you, so it is imperative you take the initiative to be cautious.

Oncoming Traffic

motor vehicle accidentOne of the main issues among motorists today is distracted driving. From texting and eating to daydreaming, many recent accidents are the result of motorists not paying attention. Even if a distracted driver simply clips a motorcycle, it can result in the rider being thrown from his bike, which could lead to serious injury. As a rider, you need to be attentive always and recognize ahead of time when a distracted driver is approaching. If you see a motorist talking on his phone or swerving out of his lane, ease up and wait for the danger to pass.

Sudden Stops

While most drivers try to be cautious, there may come a time when a sudden stop is necessary. From children darting out into the street to a vehicle pulling out in front of another, situations will occur that you could not have predicted.

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